support

US Distributor/Importer

For all US Sales, Warranty, Marketing and Technical Support

Rotor Components USA
928 Elkton Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
Tel: 866-391-0493
info@rotorbikeusa.com

Factory Headquarters

Rotor Componentes Tecnologicos, S.L
Pol. Ind. Conmar,
C/Tajo, Nave 6
Ajalvir, Madrid
Tel.: +34 91884 3846
info@rotorbike.com
www.RotorBike.com

Rotor 3D Track Cranks

(click a question to see answer)

How are Q-Rings different than other non-round rings such as Biopace and O.SYMETRIC?

Rotor Q-Rings help to minimize the time spent in the dead spot while pedaling. While oval chainrings have historically been controversial, we believe that allowing a rider to fine tune the chainring position offers opportunities to minimize the dead spot never before realized with conventional chainrings. The Q-Rings are elliptical; the Biopace and O.SYMETRIC chainrings are asymmetrical. The specific elliptical shape of the Q-Ring provides a very smooth uniform pedaling stroke; there is no sudden acceleration movement. Biopace chainrings are designed so that the maximum equivalent tooth size is at the dead-spot. Q-Rings have the minimum equivalent tooth size at the dead-spot which enables you to pass through the dead-spot quicker and with less stress to your knees. Q-Rings take into consideration static forces from your legs and the inertia of the cyclist and the bicycle. This maximizes the efficiency and comfort of conventional cranks. The Rotor patented OCP System enables you to customize the position your Q-Rings to suit your individual riding habits, body geometry, strength and position on the bike.

Will they work on my MTB singlespeed, or track bike?

Yes. MTB Q-Rings can be used for MTB singlespeed applications. We've also successfully tested and are currently producing select models of 144 BCD Track Q-Rings.

Will Q-Rings work with Campagnolo 11 speed?

Yes. The 135BCD as well as the 130BCD Q-Rings are fully compatible with Campagnolo 11 speed groups.

I have a FSA carbon crankset, will Q-Rings fit?

Yes. The current versions of Q-Rings have a bevel to allow a better fit.

I have a FSA carbon crankset, will Q-Rings fit?

Yes. The current versions of Q-Rings have a bevel to allow a better fit.

What about Stronglight, pre-2005 FSA, Zipp 300, Dura-Ace 7800, FSA BB30, SRAM BB30, Shimano Compact, etc.?

Yes. The new version of Q-Rings have a bevel to allow a better fit, and work on most 130BCD cranksets like Shimano Dura-Ace 7800, FSA-SLK, Zipp 300, Truvativ, etc. They may or may not work on certain versions of Stronglight cranksets. All models of road and compact Q-Rings are compatible with both Shimano and Campagnolo drivetrains, 9/10/11 speed, and are specially beveled to fit most cranksets such as Dura-Ace 7800, Ultegra, FSA SLK, FSA K-Force, Zipp 300, Truvativ, and most other models. One exception being that the normal outer 50T 110BCD compact Q-Ring does not fit Shimano, FSA BB30 or SRAM BB30 compact cranksets, but we have a special outer ring (Called OCP3-50) that will fit these cranks. All of the inner Q-Rings fit with no problem.

How can I check to see if my cranks are compatible with Rotor Q-Rings?

To check compatibility, place a thin ruler, or something similar along-side the Right crankarm and slide it down until it makes contact with the spider surface if the ruler makes contact with the crankarm below the two mounting holes, then the Q-Rings should fit. If the ruler makes contact before being below the mounting holes then Q-Rings may not fit your crankset. Please note that we do make a 50t design to fit most of these cranks but you are limited to the most popular #3 regulation point.

How much do Q-Rings weigh?

Weights are 153g for the 53/36T Q-Rings set, and 152g for the 54T AERO Q-Ring.

What are the measurements for the largest part of the oval on the Q-Rings?

The 53T Q-Ring measures 231mm at the major dimension, equivalent in size to a standard round 56T chainring. The 54T AERO Q-Ring measures 234mm at the major dimension, equivalent in size to a standard round 57T chainring.

What Q-Ring options are available for road triple cranksets?

Road Triple Q-Rings use the same standard 130BCD size as the Road Double sets, size 54/53/52/50/48/46T. There is presently only one size middle and two inner in the Triple Q-Rings.

What Q-Ring options are available for Campagnolo and Fulcrum compact cranks?

Currently we only have a 50/36 combination, but other options may be available in the future.

How long does it take to get used to riding the Q-Rings?

One or two rides. Seriously, that's all!

What OCP position should I start with, do you have any tips or tricks?

We generally recommend starting with OCP #3 (inner/outer) for road bike use and OCP #4 for time trial/triathlon. Your Q-Rings will include an installation guide and instructions. See the Q-Rings information page for more tips on set up.

Are Q-Rings difficult to install?

No more difficult that installing standard round chainrings. It's quite simple, in most cases all you need is a 5mm Allen wrench.

Are Q-Rings UCI legal?

Elliptical chainrings have been used in Pro Tour races for many years. The Rotor System was authorized by the UCI (International Cycling Union) for professional road bike competition in October, 2000.

I broke a tooth of my Q-Ring chainring, can I get a replacement? Is there a crash replacement program?

Contact the tech center at info@rotorbikeusa.com first. If the tooth broke off while normal riding (not making contact with a foreign object such as a rock or root) it is covered by the guarantee. After we inspect the conditions of the chainring we will be able to make a decision. Please send the chainring to Rotor USA for inspection we will replace it if qualifies for replacement. If it does not qualify for free replacement, we will notify you and replace it for a nominal cost including shipping, handling and insurance. Include your contact information in the package.

I am having some rubbing issues, is there a proper way to set up the front derailleur?

  1. Make sure the that front derailleur is high enough to clear the chainrings.
  2. Angle the back of the front derailleur inward (toward your rear wheel) about 0.5-1mm. This may solve and rubbing problems you may encounter.
  3. Be sure to use your half gear on the front shifter. Even with round rings, once you get below the 16t cog, you'll have to shift the large lever halfway which will move the front derailleur but not enough to shift onto the big ring.
  4. Most road double front derailleurs have a 16t capacity; please be sure your Q-Ring combination falls within these parameters.
If these items do not solve any rubbing issues you may have encountered, please give our Tech Center a call at 719-622-6015 for support. There should be no shifting issues at all, so there is a solution out there.

What's the difference between Rotor Cranks RS4X and Q-Rings?

Many people have asked us what the real difference in performance and functionality is between the RS4X and Q-Rings since launching Q-Rings.

Q-Rings were designed to emulate the biomechanics of the RS4X, without the independent crank arm movement. This way you receive some of the benefits of the RS4X for a lower price tag, and the weight weenies can still sleep well at night knowing that Q-Rings wont make their bike heavier. Both systems orient the maximum effective gear ratio in approximately the same position, a few degrees past the horizontal, in order to benefit from both muscle strength and leg inertia. Both Q-Rings and the RS4X can be adjusted for different riding styles (standing sprinting or seated spinning, for example), bike geometry and terrain requirements. Q-Rings cannot not apply the same degree of variance in effective chainring diameter as the RS4X does, as this variance applied to two legs simultaneously would effect the cyclists spin negatively.

The advantages of Q-Rings, in general:

  • Makes pedaling more efficient, and climbing much easier.
  • Reduce lactic acid level production and reduces heart rate demands.
  • Low weight.
  • Simplicity.
  • No extra pivots and bearing races, so maintenance is zero.
  • Less intense dead point than standard chainrings.

The disadvantages compared to the RS4X:

  • The Dead point is not eliminated: only it's intensity is reduced.
  • Biomechanical gains are less than those of the RS4X.

Do Q-Rings work for Single Speed or Downhill use?

Q-Rings will work without the need for a tensioning device.

When using a Q-Ring on a single speed bike, position the crank between 3 & 4 o’clock (largest part of the Q-Rings will facing up) and then tighten the chain the same as you would on a round ring. Because the effective tooth size is a gradual change, and not that extreme, you will be able to ride in tough terrain without the chain failing on you.

You will obviously have a small change in tension if you’re feet are at 12 & 6 o’clock, but when going downhill you’re feet will likely be positioned at 3 & 9 o’clock (highest tension). Therefore, the only time you’ll be at 6 & 12 o’clock is when you are pedaling, which means that you will be applying pressure on the chain at this point.

Why is the oval positioned differently for the inner and the outer Q-Rings?

The orientation of the oval is positioned differently for the inner and the outer ring because each ring serves a different purpose: inner for climbing and outer for time trialing or sprinting. We changed the orientation for the inner as your geometry, body position and pedaling changes when you are climbing (front wheel is up).

OCP settings changes: hardest part of the pedal stroke per each setting; measured in degrees below 3 o’clock. Most studies show that we generate the most amount of power about 18º below 3 o’clock. The list below shows the position at which the Q-Ring becomes hardest in the pedal stroke for the inner and outer ring based on the OCP setting number.

Setting #
#1…………… 08º for the 53t…………… 13º for the 40t
#2…………… 13º for the 53t…………… 18º for the 40t
#3…………… 18º for the 53t…………… 23º for the 40t
#4…………… 23º for the 53t…………… 28º for the 40t
#5…………… 28º for the 53t…………… 33º for the 40t

I recently purchased a set of Q-Rings. Some of the teeth have machine tool marks which look like machining imperfections. Is this intentional, or is it a machining problem?

The machine tool marks and cut-outs on the teeth are intentional and part of the design which helps the chain to shift better. They are referred to as a teething profile.

Will Q-Rings work with Schlumpf-drives?

Rotor Q-Rings can not be combined with Schlumpf-drives because the chainring and crankarm do not rotate at the same speed.

What's the difference between the Ágilis and RS4X cranksets?

Many people have asked us what the real difference in performance and functionality is between the Q-Rings/Ágilis and RS4X cranksets since launching the Ágilis.

The Ágilis (with SABB cupset) is a cost-effective traditional crankset which allow riders to use standard round chainrings or use Q-Rings chainrings, and configure a system that comes stock with Q-Rings, instead of having to purchase a new crankset and remove the round chainrings. Q-Rings were designed to emulate the biomechanics of the RS4X, without the independent crank arm movement. This way you receive some of the benefits of the RS4X for a lower price tag, and the weight weenies can still sleep well at night knowing that Q-Rings wont make their bike heavier. Both systems orient the maximum effective gear ratio in approximately the same position, a few degrees past the horizontal, in order to benefit from both muscle strength and leg inertia. Both Q-Rings and the RS4X can be adjusted for different riding styles (standing sprinting or seated spinning, for example), bike geometry and terrain requirements. Q-Rings cannot not apply the same degree of variance in effective chainring diameter as the RS4X does, as this variance applied to two legs simultaneously would effect the cyclists spin negatively.

The advantages of Q-Rings/Ágilis/SABB, in general:

  • Makes pedaling more efficient, and climbing much easier.
  • Reduce lactic acid level production and reduces heart rate demands.
  • Low weight.
  • Simplicity.
  • No extra pivots and bearing races, so maintenance is zero.
  • Less intense dead point than standard chainrings.

The disadvantages compared to the RS4X:

  • The Dead point is not eliminated: only it's intensity is reduced.
  • Biomechanical gains are less than those of the RS4X.

Which crank length should I choose?

Many people have asked us what crank length they should choose, or whether they should change their current crank length. We recommend you order the same size as you currently use, but also recommend that you should use one crank length for all your bikes.

A professional bike fitter will be able to supply you with a more personal recommendation.

So, how do the RS4X Cranks work?

Simply put, the RS4X increase your bicycle's gearing, slowing the power/downstroke while reducing the gearing and speeding the recovery/upstroke. The action is very brief, and hardly noticeable in your first 20 minutes of pedaling, fading into a normal feel within the first 30 minutes of riding. This gearing change allows for the removal of the dead point, increasing the time that you are "pushing" down on the pedals, and reduces the physical demand on your body, lowering your lactate production. It also allows you to ride longer with less fatigue, climb easier, and reduce the stress on your knees.

Will using the RS4X cranks really improve my performance?

We guarantee it. The RS4X mechanism improves the performance of a cyclist in two ways:

  • Riders will see more power (the energy that the rider exerts is enhanced by the RS4X more than with a traditional crank/chainwheel set.
  • The rider's body does not suffer as much, recovers faster—even performing at top levels. This has been proven in several scientific studies, which resulted in very favorable physiological results. Especially relevant are the tests by Professor Francesco Conconi (trainer of Moser, Pantani, etc.) as well as Alfredo Córdova (currently Medical Director of the Kelme professional road team).

Will the additional weight of the RS4X Cranks slow me down?

Manufacturer's listed weights for the complete new RS4X system, including BB and chainrings is 1190g for Titanium and 1270g for Steel/CRMO. The Ti System weighs only about 380 grams more than Dura Ace. Weight is mainly relevant in cycling when pedaling uphill, that is, when the combined weight of the cyclist and bike ascends against gravity. The dead point is most detrimental when pedaling uphill, so often times cyclists stand up on their pedals to remove the dead point. Otherwise legs can easily lose their regular pedaling speed (cadence) and start a jerky pedaling motion. This is exactly the kind of situation when the RS4X performs the best, by doing away with the dead point, obtaining a more continuous and efficient pedaling. The minimal extra weight is more than offset by the decisive efficiency and advantage of the RS4X mechanism, obtaining a net performance well over that of a bike fitted with a traditional crank/chainwheel set. To prove this, one of the Rotor factory cyclists, Julián Adrada won, with a ROTORIZED bicycle, the 1999 and 2000 uphill race "Gamonal" (also known as "L'Angliru"), where there are road stretches with up to 23.5% grade.

Will it take me a long time to become accustomed to the RS4X pedaling cadence?

There are two adaptation processes:

Technical adaptation: As with any “different” feeling mechanism, the RS4X requires some miles for adaptation. Some technical aspects change, such as balancing the bike while pedaling through curves, and pedaling downhill. The RS4X alters the point of balance when standing on pedals, or pedaling cadence, but after a few initial miles, the cranks will feel normal, and pedaling becomes uniform and comfortable.

Muscular adaptation:the RS4X makes muscles work differently, in a more natural and ergonomic way. The RS4X applies all muscular potential, so ROTOR riders normally increase their quadriceps volume. Muscles need time to cope with this. Even if the benefits are noticeable from the first ride, a complete muscular adaptation takes at least several days, depending on the rider's level.

Will the RS4X Crank System fit my bike and/or my recumbent?

Our product is technologically optimized; it has been developed with the cooperation of the School for Aeronautic Engineers at the University of Madrid. Only materials (7075 aluminum and aeronautic titanium) of the highest quality are used in the production and assembly of the RS4X. All required materials are CNC machined. The RS4X bottom brackets are based on a variable transmission ratio (not fixed at 180º) during a pedal cycle, so that cranks turn at different angular speeds, and they may make an impression of tightness compared to a traditional bottom bracket. This is not due to friction, but due to this geometric layout. The minimal friction is already accounted for in the studies, since all ROTOR performance figures are net.

Hasn’t this concept been tried before?

Several commercial firms have unsuccessfully attempted to eliminate the dead point in the pedaling cycle by using oval and/or elliptical chainrings. After 200 years of pedaling with the dead point, this Spanish breakthrough has managed to eliminate the traditional inefficiency in pedaling.

Is the RS4XCrank System UCI legal?

The Rotor System was authorized by the UCI (International Cycling Union) for professional road bike competition in October, 2000.

What are the regulation points, and how do they work?

The RS4X is designed with several regulation points that vary the amount of muscular force required to move the cranks. A user has the ability to determine the correct regulation point, depending on their physical characteristics or the conditions in which they are going to use the RS4X. These different regulation points are marked on the power plate in front of the right crank. The middle regulation point is recommended for the majority of users, however, it may be necessary to adjust or change the regulation point, especially for competition. The RS4X is correctly regulated when the individual user feels most comfortable.

Keep in mind the following points when regulating the Rotor System: a) The correct point is that which feels most comfortable and maintains maximum performance in all riding conditions for each individual user; increased speed or eased climbing. b) If improved performance while climbing is desired, the RS4X should be regulated one point lower, permitting stronger abilities in climbs. c) If improved performance on flat terrain or increased speed is desired, the RS4X should be regulated one point higher, permitting higher speeds.

Will the RS4X fit my Cervelo P3C, Look 496, or comparable carbon TT bike?

Yes. You can purchase a machined down plate (Fig 7.4) with machined down bolts. Please contact us at info@rotorbikeusa.com for more information.

Can I upgrade the bearings in my RS4X Crank System to ceramic?

There are some ceramic bearings available; please call 719-622-6015 for available options and prices.

How do I update the Firmware on my Rotor Power Meter crankset?

There is a PDF guide available in the Power Cranks section of our Support page. If you have questions about updating, please call our U.S. office at +1 (866) 931-0493.

How long will it take to get my package from Rotor Bike USA?

Most orders are shipped via USPS Priority Mail which arrives in 2-3 days. UPS Ground takes 3-5 working days. Orders placed before 3pm MST ship the same day.

Which payment methods and credit cards do you accept?

Visa, MasterCard and Paypal can be used for online orders. We also accept personal checks (10 day hold), money orders, cashier's checks, and bank wire transfer.

Do you accept American Express or Discover?

Yes, we accept American Express and Discover, but only for phone orders. If you wish to place your order over the phone, please call 719-622-6015. We'd be happy to assist you.

Can I fax in my credit card number or mail in a money order?

Yes, you may fax or mail in your payment and order.

Please mail your payment to:

Rotor Components USA
928 Elkton Dr
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
Please reference your order number in the notes field on your check or money order.